Fonts of Dis-Knowledge

The oracles of ancient Greece claimed to have the power of precognition, derived from the gods themselves. In the 17th century, John Locke wrote of more experiential sources for ideas, where sensation and reflection were two fountains of knowledge.

But none of these philosophical considerations are necessary to predict the effect of plugins on browser security. In the course of putting a presentation together, I’ve annotated two particular items.

Java. The Comic Sans of browser plugins. Inexplicably, some people think it’s a clever design choice. But it really conveys an uninformed decision, is ultimately useless (especially for modern browsers), and is a sign of incompetence.

Flash. Wingdings. At first it looks pretty. But its overuse quickly leads to annoyance. There’s no reason for a Flash plugin other than to look at legacy cat videos and suffer agitating ad banners.

They are nothing more than fonts of malware. When was the last time you installed a non-critical update for either one? If you haven’t disabled these plugins, do so now.

I’ll have new content soon. And, with my own knowledge of the future, here’s a peek at what those topics might be:

– Ruminations on privacy.
– Identity, passwords, personas.
– More examples of HTML injection.

And that doesn’t include putting up content for the newly released Anti-Hacker Tool Kit. Alas, my fountain of writing is a mere trickle!