Battling Geologic Time

65 million years ago, dinosaurs ruled the earth. (Which also seems about the last time I wrote something new here.)

In 45 million lines of code, Windows XP dominated the desktop. Yes it had far too many security holes and people held onto it for far too long — even after Microsoft tried to pull support for the first time. But its duration is still a testament to a certain measure of success.

Much of today’s web still uses code that dates from the dawn of internet time, some new code is still written by dinosaurs, and even more code is written by the avian descendants of dinosaurs. These birds flock to new languages and new frameworks. Yet, looking at some of the trivial vulns that emerge (like hard-coded passwords and SQL built from string concatenation), it seems the bird brain hasn’t evolved as much security knowledge as we might wish.

I’m a fan of dead languages. I’ve mentioned before my admiration of Latin (as well as Harry Potter Latin). And hieroglyphs have an attractive mystery to them. This appreciation doesn’t carry over to Perl. (I wish I could find the original comment that noted an obfuscated Perl contest is a redundant effort.)

But I do love regular expressions. I’ve crafted, tweaked, optimized, and obscured my fair share of regexes over the years. And I’ve discovered the performance benefits of pcre_study() and JIT compilation mode.

Yet woe betide anyone using regexes as a comprehensive parser (especially for HTML). And if you’re trying to match quoted strings, be prepared to deal with complexities that turn a few character pattern into a monstrous composition.

Seeing modern day humans still rely on poorly written regexes to conduct code scanning made me wonder how little mammals have advanced beyond the dinosaurs of prehistory. They might not be burning themselves with fire, but they’re burning their chances of accurate, effective scans.

That was how I discovered pfff and its companion, sgrep. At the SOURCE Seattle conference this year I spoke a little about lessons learned from regexes and the advancements possible should you desire to venture into the realm of OCaml: SOURCE Seattle 2015 – Code Scanning. Who knows, if you can conquer fire you might be able to handle stone tools.

The Resurrected Skull

It’s been seven hours and fifteen days.

No. Wait. It’s been seven years and much more than fifteen days.

But nothing compares to the relief of finishing the 4th edition of The Anti-Hacker Toolkit. The book with the skull on its cover. A few final edits need to be wrangled, but they’re minor compared to the major rewrite this project entailed.

AHT 1st Edition

The final word count comes in around 200,000. That’s slightly over twice the length of Hacking Web Apps. (Or roughly 13,000 Tweets or 200 blog posts.) Those numbers are just trivia associated with the mechanics of writing. The reward of writing is the creative process and the (eventual…) final product.

In retrospect (and through the magnfying lens of self-criticism), some of the writing in the previous edition was awful. Some of it was just inconsistent with terminology and notation. Some of it was unduly sprinkled with empty phrases or sentences that should have been more concise. Fortunately, it apparently avoided terrible cliches (all cliches are terrible, I just wanted to emphasize my distaste for them).

Many tools have been excised; others have been added. A few pleaded to remain despite their questionable relevance (I’m looking at you, wardialers). But such content was trimmed to make way for the modern era of computers without modems or floppy drives.

The previous edition had a few quaint remarks, such as a reminder to save files to a floppy disk, references to COM ports, and astonishment at file sizes that weighed in at a few dozen megabytes. The word zombie appeared three times, although none of the instances were as threatening as the one that appeared in my last book.

Over the next few weeks I’ll post more about this new edition and introduce you to its supporting web site. This will give you a flavor for what the book contains better than any book-jacket marketing dazzle.

In spite of the time dedicated to the book, I’ve added 17 new posts this year. Five of them have broken into the most-read posts since January. So, while I take some down time from writing, check out the archives for items you may have missed.

And if you enjoy reading content here, please share it! Twitter has proven to be the best mechanism for gathering eyeballs. Also, consider pre-ordering the new 4th edition or checking out my current book on web security. In any case, thanks for stopping by.

Meanwhile, I’ll be relaxing to music. I’ve put Sinéad O’Connor in the queue; it’s a beautiful piece. (And a cover of a Prince song, which reminds me to put some Purple Rain in the queue, too). Then it’s on to a long set of Sisters of Mercy, Wumpscut, Skinny Puppy, and anything else that makes it feel like every day is Halloween.